Immunizations

2020 FLU STATUS: UPDATED 12/1/2020

 

We currently have Flu Mist for State Insuance Patients.

we do not have any Private Flu Mist at this time.

Please call the office to see when we can set up an appointment for any flu immunizations.

You can always contact your local pharmacy to see if they may be able to offer a more convient time.

Please note that you can contact your local pharmacies in regards to flu vaccinations.

State funded insurances are to include Fidelis, United Healthcare, Medicaid and Child Health Plus.

We are continuing to get irregular, partial shipments of our Flu Vaccine order.

Following AAP guidelines, our priority will be vaccinating those patients at highest risk:

Patients with chronic, severe ashtma or lung conditions.

Children coming in for their annual physicals will be offered the vaccine as available at the time of their visit.

We will update this information when new information becomes available.


COVID Vaccination Information


 Plattsburgh Primary Care Pediatrics is not currently offering the COVID-19 Vaccination. 

The local airport is offering to certain residents. See below for more information.

Residents can register for an appointment by visiting https://covid19vaccine.health.ny.gov/ and clicking on “Am I Eligible?

Residents can also call 1-833-NYS-4VAX (1-833-697-4829) for assistance with registration.

Please note, many residents are attempting to make appointments at the same time and both systems may be overloaded. It may take several attempts before getting through; please be patient."
The location site is 213 Connecticut road Plattsburgh, NY 12903


Plattsburgh Primary Care Pediatrics follows the immunization guidelines recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). For information about these vaccines and the diseases they protect against, please visit their webpage.

For detailed informational sheets published by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) please visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis.

Our Vaccine Philosophy

Our practice believes that all children should receive the recommended vaccines according to the guidelines provided by the AAP and the CDC. Vaccines are safe and effective in preventing diseases and health complications in children and young adults. Regular vaccinations help children ward off infections, and are administered as one of the safest and best methods of disease prevention.

We are happy to discuss your concerns about vaccines at your child's next visit.

Recommended Immunization Schedule

  • 0-6 Years -Schedule for Persons Aged 0 Through 6 Years
  • 7-18 Years -Schedule for Persons Aged 7 Through 18 Years
  • Catch-up Schedule -Schedule for Persons Aged Birth Through 18 Years Who Start Late or Who Are More Than 1 Month Behind

Resources

AAP Health Initiative and Communicating with Families Information

Recommended Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule—United States, 2017

 

INFORMATION FOR PARENTS
HPV Vaccines Are Safe For Your Child
HPV vaccines are safe and recommended for
girls and boys at age 11 or 12

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common virus that affects men and women. HPV can cause cancers of the cervix, vagina, and vulva in women; cancer of the penis in men, and cancers of the anus and throat in men and women.
HPV vaccination is recommended for girls and boys at ages 11 or 12.There are three HPV vaccines approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to protect against HPV and the cancers it can cause.
Like all vaccines used in the United States, HPV vaccines are required to go through years of safety testing before they are approved by the FDA. CDC and FDA closely monitor vaccines to make sure they are safe even after they are available to
the public.
HPV vaccines have good safety records. Studies have shown that each HPV vaccine is very safe, and careful safety monitoring has not shown any problems.
HPV vaccines are very safe. CDC has carefully studied the risks of HPV vaccination. The benefits of HPV vaccination, such as prevention of cancer, far outweigh the risks of possible side effects.
Like any vaccine or medicine, HPV vaccines can cause side effects
Some people have mild side effects after getting the HPV vaccine. Common side effects include:
• Pain, swelling, or redness in the arm where the shot
was given
• Fever
• Headache or feeling tired
• Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach pain
• Muscle or joint pain
Talk with your doctor about any health concerns before vaccination
If your child is scheduled for HPV vaccination, tell your doctor about any severe allergies. Some children should not get some HPV vaccines, including:
• Children who have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any ingredient of an HPV vaccine, or to a previous dose of HPV vaccine
• Children who have an allergy to yeast (Gardasil and
Gardasil 9)
• Children who have an allergy to latex (Cervarix)
HPV vaccines are safe for children who are mildly ill – for example, with a low-grade fever of less than 101 degrees, a cold, runny nose, or cough. Children with a moderate or severe illness should wait until they are better.
09/09/2015 CS256663B
How many people was it tested in? Gardasil: More than 29,000 volunteers. Cervarix: More than 30,000 volunteers, and Gardasil 9: More than 15,000 volunteers
When was it approved? Gardasil: 2006. Cervarix: 2009 and Gardasil 9: 2014
Who is it recommended for? Gardasil: Girls and boys at age 11 or 12. Cervarix: Girls age 11 or 12. Gardasil 9: Girls and boys at age 11 or 12. 

HPV Vaccines Are Safe For Your Child
The safety of HPV vaccines was tested in thousands of volunteers before the vaccines were approved
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Family Physicians, and American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommend children receive all vaccines according to the recommended schedule.
Seek medical care if your child has a reaction
If your child is having a severe allergic reaction or other health emergency, call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.
Look for any signs or symptoms that concern you, like signs of a severe allergic reaction, very high fever, or behavior changes. These would start a few minutes to a few hours after the shot is given.
Signs of a severe allergic reaction can include:
After seeing a doctor, you should report the reaction to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). CDC and FDA use this system to track possible vaccine side effects. Your doctor can file this report, or you can do it yourself through
the VAERS website at www.vaers.hhs.gov, or by calling
1-800-822-7967.
 

The center for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Family Physicians, and American Academy of Pediatrics Strongly Recommend children receive all vaccines according to the recommended scedule.

 

If you have any questions or comments please utilize our patient portal or call the office at 518-562-0151.